Future Watch

Saxony State Exhibition 2020 Entrance Pavilion, Germany

Saxony is the cradle of industrialization in Germany. With the decision to present the leading exhibition on 500 years of industrial culture history as part of the 4th Saxon State Exhibition in the Audi Hall in Zwickau, a concept was sought that not only addresses the technical requirements of the high flow of visitors but also addresses issues of sustainability in our time takes a stand. The implemented design concept goes beyond that.

It uses existing industrial goods repetitively and combines them to form an entrance building with a ramp system to receive visitors to the exhibition and to guide them into the former assembly and production hall. In accordance with the implementation of all new construction volumes from sea containers, the development of the equipment elements such as counters and lockers from toolboxes, seating furniture from car tires consistently follows the model of subsequent use. Topics such as industrial heritage, product exchange, and recycling processes can thus be read as a form-defining aesthetic. The existing building, built by Th. Quaysin for Audi-Union AG in 1938-39, was built at the time with the aim of making the greatest possible savings and the aim of a construction method that was as low in iron as possible. All current interventions and renovation work are designed according to the same principle and underline the original character of the building.

Raffles City, Chongqing

Following eight years of design, development, and construction, Safdie Architects is nearing completion on its latest project in China: Raffles City Chongqing, a vibrant complex which combines office, residential, hotel, retail, and recreational facilities across a 22.7 acre site, embedded within the densely developed Yuzhong district. Situated at the confluence of the Yangtze and Jialing rivers, the historically significant site was once home to the city’s most important gateway and the imperial entrance to the city: Chaotian Gate. The area was also Chongqing’s foremost riverfront trading post which has traditionally driven development in this inland city, catalysing its evolution to become one of the world’s fastest growing and densest cities with a greater metropolitan population of over 30 million people.

A phased opening of Raffles City Chongqing commenced in September 2019 with the unveiling of a 220,000 sq.m., five-story retail galleria and continues into early 2020, culminating with the opening of The Crystal, a 300m-long horizontal skyscraper perched at 250m and stretching across four of the development’s eight towers. Inherently site-specific, Safdie Architects’ design for Raffles City Chongqing responds to the city’s character as well as its mountainous landscape and extreme climate. The project embodies a considered approach to issues of population density, community connectivity, and urban renewal within a highly developed city center.

With a total built area of over 1 million square meters (approx. 11 million square feet), it is one of the most complex projects to date. It continues the firm’s exploration of vertical neighbourhoods, liveable urban communities, and thoughtfully connected public spaces. As with other Safdie projects, priority is given to maximizing access to daylight, air, greenspace, and views.

In order to achieve this in Chongqing, the development’s diverse program elements are distributed across eight slender towers which soar above a retail podium which features an expansive rooftop public park and civic plaza that connects directly to the city’s higher elevation streets. To account for the hilly terrain, the retail podium provides multiple entry points into the development at different elevations.

Musée Atelier Audemars Piguet, Switzerland

Musée Atelier Audemars Piguet, Switzerland

The Musée Atelier’s spiral-shaped pavilion, designed by BIG and realised by the Swiss architecture office CCHE, seamlessly rises on walls of structural curved glass. A feat of engineering and design, it is the first construction of its kind to be built at such altitude. The curved glazing entirely supports the steel roof, while a brass mesh runs along the external surface to regulate light and temperature. The green roof further helps regulate temperature, while absorbing water.

In the light-filled new building, ATELIER BRÜCKNER has incorporated a rhythmically flowing route through the exhibition. It starts in the historic building and, going in a clockwise direction, slopes gently down into the heart of the spiral, after which it rises again on the contrary direction – filled with energy like the springs of a watch. Visitors experience the route as a flowing continuum with a composed narration. Each chapter has its own design language and is introduced by an interlude, a mechanical sculpture, or an artistically designed display item. The showcases are positioned within the architecture precisely.

At the centre of the architecture and the exhibition, there is a single watch that has an incredible 21 complications: the “Universelle” is the most complicated watch that Audemars Piguet has ever created. It is presented in a glass sphere, whereby the front and rear are shown as equally valuable views. Eight other watches with Grande Complications are placed around the “Universelle”. The design is reminiscent of a solar system with planets rotating around a sun on their orbits. After all, astronomic cycles are what determine the essence of watchmaking.

The spiral has been designed to perfectly integrate the surrounding landscape. The floors follow different slants to adapt to the natural gradient of the land and provide the basis of the museum’s inner layout stretched into a linear continuous spatial experience. Inside, the curved glass walls converge clockwise towards the spiral’s centre, before moving in the opposite direction: visitors travel through the building as they would through the spring of a timepiece.

Floating Farm Poultry Rotterdam

An urban farm that combines facilities for 7000 hens with a level for farming vegetables, herbs, and cresses. Like the adjacent cow farm, the new floating construction is organised as a logically stacked and compact agricultural building. besides being a functional farm, the building also fulfils an educational role for the city and its inhabitants, with most facilities made visible to visitors as much as possible.

The lower level (consisting of three concrete pontoons) is fully utilised for farming vegetables, herbs, and cresses, while the upper level is the poultry farm for egg-laying hens. Both production floors relate to the factory floor via elevators and shafts, resulting in two fully utilized levels for eggs and crops, with a factory floor for processing and packaging products in between. Each of the levels has its own appearance in concrete, fully transparent glass, and translucent polycarbonate panels. a steel frame with PV panels tops the entire structure, creating a strong and recognisable silhouette.

The project incorporates technologies based on circular principles with the aim to minimize the ecological footprint of all levels in the building. The mostly submerged level of the crop producing LED farm recirculates warm humid air, and an efficient air- and energy system reduces emissions of poultry dust and nitrogen.

Chicken manure will be dried into fertiliser granules, while the steel frame with PV panels articulates the architecture and generates a high percentage of the necessary electricity on board.

The floating farm poultry is the subsequent step in the planned “outstrips” that will offer a wider variety of agricultural products,’ notes goldsmith. This farm will connect to several circular flows that are already present on site. the realisation of the floating farm poultry will hopefully strengthen the position of both farms within the city’s urban ecology and the M4H (merwe-vierhaven) developments. Not only as a new function for a previously abandoned area, but mainly as a recognisable icon within a city district under development.

Musée Atelier Audemars Piguet, Switzerland

The Musée Atelier’s spiral-shaped pavilion, designed by BIG and realised by the Swiss architecture office CCHE, seamlessly rises on walls of structural curved glass. A feat of engineering and design, it is the first construction of its kind to be built at such altitude. The curved glazing entirely supports the steel roof, while a brass mesh runs along the external surface to regulate light and temperature. The green roof further helps regulate temperature, while absorbing water.

In the light-filled new building, ATELIER BRÜCKNER has incorporated a rhythmically flowing route through the exhibition. It starts in the historic building and, going in a clockwise direction, slopes gently down into the heart of the spiral, after which it rises again on the contrary direction – filled with energy like the springs of a watch. Visitors experience the route as a flowing continuum with a composed narration. Each chapter has its own design language and is introduced by an interlude, a mechanical sculpture, or an artistically designed display item. The showcases are positioned within the architecture precisely.

At the centre of the architecture and the exhibition, there is a single watch that has an incredible 21 complications: the “Universelle” is the most complicated watch that Audemars Piguet has ever created. It is presented in a glass sphere, whereby the front and rear are shown as equally valuable views. Eight other watches with Grande Complications are placed around the “Universelle”. The design is reminiscent of a solar system with planets rotating around a sun on their orbits. After all, astronomic cycles are what determine the essence of watchmaking.

The spiral has been designed to perfectly integrate the surrounding landscape. The floors follow different slants to adapt to the natural gradient of the land and provide the basis of the museum’s inner layout stretched into a linear continuous spatial experience. Inside, the curved glass walls converge clockwise towards the spiral’s centre, before moving in the opposite direction: visitors travel through the building as they would through the spring of a timepiece.

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles

During the 92nd academy awards ceremony, Tom Hanks announced that Renzo Piano’s academy museum for Motion Pictures in Los Angeles will open to the public on December 14, 2020. Billed as ‘the world’s premier film institution,’ detailed plans for the much-anticipated museum and theatre complex were first unveiled in late 2017 after construction began on site along Wilshire and Fairfax in 2015.

Major construction has been completed on the already iconic building designed by Italian Architect Renzo piano, the academy museum has recently announced that it has reached the 95 per cent mark in its $388 million pre-opening campaign, and installation of four floors of immersive, innovative exhibitions is now underway.

The Academy Museum director Bill Kramer states they cannot wait to welcome the whole world to the academy museum. When the doors open on December 14, the thrilling combination of exhibitions, screenings, and public and educational programs will create unparalleled experiences for movie lovers everywhere.
This is a museum that only the academy could create: exciting and illuminating; historic and contemporary. One should look forward to sharing the global reach of cinema.’

The dream of this museum will finally become a reality — a gathering place for filmmakers and movie fans from around the world, where we can share the Oscars legacy and further fulfil the academy’s mission to connect the world through cinema.’

Luma Arles Tower, France

A twisting tower clad designed by architect Frank Gehry, is taking form in the south of France. Constructed from a concrete core and steel frame, the scheme emerges from a circular glass atrium echoing the town’s Roman amphitheater.

The distinctive jagged form above the atrium echoes the region’s rugged mountain ranges, with glass boxes extruding from reflective aluminum panels. Due to be 56 meters high when complete, the tower is formed of a concrete core with a steel frame. Glass boxes and shining aluminum panels are stacked around this in an irregular formation above a circular glass atrium.

Gehry’s design for the facade is supposed to echo the craggy rock formations found near the city, the same kind that inspired sometime-resident Vincent van Gogh to paint them in 1888.

Inside, a vast circular atrium will recall the Roman amphitheater in Arles, part of the city’s designated UNESCO World Heritage site. Led by swiss collector Maja Hoffmann, LUMA Arles occupies a former rail depot with a campus designed to showcase some of the art world’s biggest names.

The Frank Gehry-designed tower will house a variety of different programs, including research facilities, workshop and seminar rooms, and artist studios. The entire site will be set within a public park. The tower’s opening date has been pushed back to spring 2020, but new photos show the irregular form of the metallic tower taking shape above the city of Arles.

Seattle Aquarium Ocean Pavilion, Washington

Design practice LMN Architects have unveiled new details of the design for the Seattle Aquarium Ocean Pavilion. The $113 million project will include the 50,000-square-foot Pavilion sited adjacent to the existing Seattle Aquarium. The pavilion will link together the new Seattle Waterfront, downtown and the historic Pike Place Market.

As LMN explains, the new Ocean Pavilion will integrate a complex building program into Seattle’s urban context. Guided by Seattle Aquarium’s mission to inspire conservation of the marine environment, the new facility focuses on global stories like climate change and ocean acidification. Exhibits rooted in the ecosystem of the Coral Triangle and Indo-Pacific region highlight the interconnectivity of the ocean with local waters, inspiring visitors to connect the welfare of the Puget Sound to the greater Pacific Ocean.

Dedicated primarily to sharks and stingray, the pavilion will include a 325,000-gallon warm-water tank for a range of species. Adjacent to the large tank will be a flexible space capable of hosting events for up to 200 people. The program also includes gathering spaces for smaller groups participating in hands-on education activities and guided interpretation. Seattle Aquarium president and chief executive officer Bob Davidson said that, “The Ocean Pavilion will be at the crossroads of the city. It’s a gift, and it’s also a statement of the importance of Seattle’s relationship to the water and the ocean.”

The design also includes an oculus the “Sharkulus”offering views into the main exhibit from both the plaza level and rooftop terrace. Exhibits within the Pavilion are composed of four primary experiential zones. Circulation pathways through the Pavilion’s levels will offer both above and below-water views of exhibits, as well as views to the Aquarium Plaza and waterfront.

The Seattle Aquarium Ocean Pavilion is scheduled for completion in 2023.

Spain Pavilion

Architecture firms Selgascano and FRPO have been selected as finalists to design Spain’s National Pavilion for EXPO 2020 in Dubai. The winning proposal includes an inflatable canopy of nine yellow ETFE cylinders set within a steel framework. Reinterpreting the Spanish plaza, the design creates a new take on the public square. The pavilion was made to be ultralight as a more sustainable structure that could be easily removed and transported. Formed as a ‘breathing pavilion’, the design allows two inflatables to move up and down to respond to views, light and breeze.

As expo 2020 will be held during Dubai’s cooler months, selgascano and FRPO’s design takes advantage the lower temperatures with a generous amount of outdoor space.

The two cylinders at the front of the pavilion can move up and down, opening or closing the pavilion in response to climatic conditions and events beneath the dynamic canopy, a matrix of fans helps circulate air, while shade, ventilation, and micro-evaporation are used to ensure comfort. As with any other plaza, the idea of the square is linked to the presence of water, which is never wasted conceived as oases, three areas of native vegetation and moving water help temper the heat, while serving as sources of freshness, shade, and life. Meanwhile, a single-floor exhibition space joins other services beneath the pavilion’s elevated square.

Design team also suggests that the structure, particularly the inflatable deck, could be easily assembled in a second location, such as a fairground as more than 80 per cent of the material used will be certified recycled material, other elements could be recycled or reused independently.

Shipwreck tower, Czech Republic

A red shipwreck crashes into this high-rise, which Black n’ Arch and sculptor David Černý have designed for developer Trigema on the outskirts of Prague. The shipwreck will envelop the 135-metre-high building, named Top Tower, which is expected to become the tallest building in Czech Republic and contain a mix of housing and office spaces.

Its striking form is designed by Black n’ Arch and sculptor Černý to serve as a stark reminder of climate change – imagining a future where a shipwreck has collided with a building during an apocalypse caused by storms and rising sea levels.

Named Top Tower, the building has been commissioned by Prague developer Trigema, and is currently undergoing planning permission for a site close to the capital city’s metro station Nové Butovice.

Trigema has projected that construction will begin in 2021, with the building set to take less than three years to complete. It is hoped that the tower, which is outside Prague’s urban conservation area, will revitalise the public pedestrian zone outside the metro station. “The project under preparation will be outside the protected zone of the urban conservation area and outside the area prohibiting high-rise buildings,” explained Trigema.

“At the same time, it is located far enough away from the Prague, so that it will not be visible from the vast majority of places in the centre of the metropolis and will not disturb the historical city skyline.”

Though little detail has been disclosed about Top Tower’s structure, the shipwreck is expected to be made made of red-coloured steel and wrapped with climbing plants – standing out from the pared-back rectangular tower. At its highest point, the shipwreck will enclose a public observation deck that is accessed by an external lift. The main building will also feature a rooftop garden offering visitors panoramic views of the city.