TECH TICKER

Sheikh Nahyan Centre, Lebanon

CASID is a recent addition to the existing and firmly rooted fabric of the University of Balamand. It creates a forum for cultural, intellectual, and religious exchange; and aims to embody the progressive ethos of the University, fortifying its role as a nexus for excellence in education, thought, and dialogue within the Arab world. Located on a gently sloping site with an unobstructed view of a walnut grove, the campus in the foreground, and the Mediterranean Sea beyond, the design of CASID evolved from the concept of dialogue.

The building aims to engage faculty, students and visitors alike, be a non-authoritarian accessible platform for cultural and intellectual exchange, and offer a progressive image of Arabs to the world. A modern interpretation of the traditional courtyard buildings of the Levant, CASID is not a fort like structure. On the contrary, it knits itself into the site, opens to all its surroundings, and engages with them. A forum for the entire campus, it opens up towards the West symbolizing its role as a vehicle for intercultural dialogue.

Access to the building is provided from all sides and respective levels of streets and landscape around, further symbolizing its role as a nexus of exchange accessible to all.

The eastern part of the building roots itself into the landscape, and is built perpendicular to it, reflecting how traditional Levant architecture deals with construction on a slope. The western part hovers heroically creating the main entrance aligned to the street while embodying the aspirations Arabs must have for the future. The southern part acts as a natural extension to the landscape itself. The roof is seen as the fifth elevation clearly visible from the hills around, and therefore developed into an accessible green roof preserving the planted heritage of the site and providing another public space with unparalleled views. The materials pallet chosen for CASID is simple and precise.

Yeoui-Naru Floating Ferry Terminal

The main objective of the “Manta Ray” project is to enhance the site’s natural irrigation by transforming the park into an ecological forest of willow tree, for natural protection of the banks against river floods. The project’s ambition is to turn Yeouido Park into a genuine cultural hub, where nature progressively asserts its rights over the concrete city again to better protect it. The urban plan articulates around four biomimetic-looking projects whose architecture is densely vegetalized. These four cores are linked to the public transit system by fruit and vegetable gardens, and by a cable-stayed pedestrian bridge.

Yeoui-Naru: The first core includes the construction of a ferry terminal that manages the residents’ river transit and includes cultural spaces showcasing the history and development projects related to the river, which runs through the city of Seoul;

  • Yeouijeong: The second core includes the landscaping of the river bank, bringing back large terraces, pedestrian paths, bicycle lanes, and an amphitheater along the river that that take advantage of the site’s natural slope. The marsh-like bank can accommodate traveling bars such as barges or tiny houses.
  • Yeoui Terrace: The third core includes the development of the park’s upper ground along Yeoui-Dong road and its famous lining of cherry blossom trees. Shops dedicated to “Han River, Seoul” products, fish or shellfish restaurants and organic farmers’ markets are connected directly to the subway line 5.
  • Ari Cultural Center: The fourth core includes a cultural complex dedicated to temporary or permanent exhibitions, as well as a science center and creative workshops for children.

Panoramic floating steel dikes along the lower docks, linked together with flexible seals, they surround and protect the marina from water currents. These floating piers integrate the technical equipment inside double floors, supplying boats with energy (water and electricity) and biofuels. In the heart of the marina, a floating theatre can be used to organize outdoor shows, while amphibious gardens line up the piers. From the radial and concentric floating piers, tree-like structures made of CLT (cross laminated timber) harvested from eco-responsible Korean forests rise towards the sky. Woven in a honeycomb pattern, those trees branch out at the top, creating the structure of a giant Manta ray over the marina. Inside their trunk, spiral staircases, glass elevators and helical ramps provide access to service and recreational equipment located on the upper level, and to the rooftop. Reception and leisure areas, food courts and exhibition and educational spaces are laid out in the programmatic functional rings, freely punctuating the large double-curved open space area.

Igloo, Israel

To mark the city’s first crafts and design biennale, product design studio magenta workshop has brought an igloo to the warmer climes of tel aviv. Handmade with sheets of stainless steel and using traditional building methods, the installation reflects its surrounding environment. evoking ideas of shelter and refuge, the concept behind the work aims to question our relationship with nature and the important role it plays.

An igloo is a home, a temporary refuge, a primeval dwelling made of snow, an archetypal structure that, when no longer in use, dissolves into a puddle of water. magenta workshop’s igloo is a structure aspiring to forge a connection between traditional societies, ancient construction methods, and new materials and technologies.

It was meticulously constructed by hand, yet its simple form is the result of a complex mathematical computation. sealed like a burial structure, it is composed of reflective stainless-steel sheets that reflect, replicate, and distort its surroundings. it echoes vanishing traditions and melting glaciers, blinding, and warming the viewers while raising questions about the role of humans in the world and their relations with nature.

Charles Library at Temple University, United States

Sited at the intersection of two major pedestrian pathways, Polett Walk and Liacouras Walk, and at the nexus of Temple’s Main Campus, the project anchors a new social and academic heart for the university’s diverse student body of over 39,000. Woven into the fabric of North Philadelphia, the building sits just one block off Broad Street, the connecting artery to the city.

Within its dynamic urban context, Snøhetta’s design, developed in collaboration with Stantec, reinterprets the traditional typology of the research library as a repository for books, integrating the building with a diversity of collaborative and social learning spaces. In offering more than double the amount of study spaces than its 1960s predecessor, Paley Library, the 220,000-square-foot Library anticipates over 5 million annual visitors. By uniting a plethora of academic resources, disciplines, and cutting-edge technology under one roof, Charles Library stewards Temple’s progressive mission to provide equitable learning experiences for its students, its faculty, and the surrounding community.

The lobby’s domed atrium offers views to every corner of the building, serving as a way finding anchor and placing the user at the center of the library’s activity. An oculus carved into the expansive cedar-clad dome allows light to pour into the lobby from the uppermost floor, connecting the terminus of the library back to its beginning. The steel-clad main stair is immediately visible from the entry as it winds up to the highest level of the building, inviting people to climb upwards. As people move through the building, this visual and physical connectivity allows them to maintain their bearings and encourages usage of all of the building’s resources.

Charles Library, Philadelphia

Sited at the intersection of two major pedestrian pathways, Polett Walk and Liacouras Walk, and at the nexus of Temple’s Main Campus, the project anchors a new social and academic heart for the university’s diverse student body of over 39,000. Woven into the fabric of North Philadelphia, the building sits just one block off of Broad Street, the connecting artery to the city.

Within its dynamic urban context, Snøhetta’s design, developed in collaboration with Stantec, reinterprets the traditional typology of the research library as a repository for books, integrating the building with a diversity of collaborative and social learning spaces and in offering more than double the amount of study spaces than its 1960s predecessor, Paley Library, the 220,000-square-foot Library anticipates over 5 million annual visitors. By uniting a plethora of academic resources, disciplines, and cutting-edge technology under one roof, Charles Library stewards Temple’s progressive mission to provide equitable learning experiences for its students, its faculty, and the surrounding community.

The lobby’s domed atrium offers views to every corner of the building, serving as a wayfinding anchor and placing the user at the center of the library’s activity. An oculus carved into the expansive cedar-clad dome allows light to pour into the lobby from the uppermost floor, connecting the terminus of the library back to its beginning. The steel-clad main stair is immediately visible from the entry as it winds up to the highest level of the building, inviting people to climb upwards. As people move through the building, this visual and physical connectivity allows them to maintain their bearings and encourages usage of all the building’s resources.

Pedestrian Bridge, Boston

Architecture firm Payette has created a pedestrian bridge at Northeastern University in Boston with tall metal walls and slender glazed openings that offer a glimpse of passing trains. Designed by local firmPayette, the Northeastern University Pedestrian Crossing, called PedX, is located on the school’s campus in central Boston.

Stretching 320 feet (98 metres), the bridge links the core part of campus on the north with the new Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex (ISEC) on the south. The 234,000-square-foot (21,739-square metre) building was also designed by Payette. The curving bridge, which passes over five active rail lines, also serves as an important pedestrian link between the Fenway and Roxbury neighbourhoods.

“It is a much-needed safe and fully accessible route at a key juncture in Boston,” the firm said in a project description. At the northern end, the bridge is entered via stairs or an elevator. On the other side, it flows into the sloped landscape surrounding the ISEC building. The bridge is supported by steel girders, with the west beam carrying the primary load of the span. The deck is constructed from steel decking topped with concrete.

Recyclable Shed, China

Chinese practice LUO Studio has designed a glass and metal shed-like structure to provide a temporary home for the Shengli Market in Puyang City, China, while its original site is redeveloped. LUO Studio designed the market from simple, low-cost and lightweight materials that could be recycled once the market moves out. The practice drew on designs for industrial sheds and greenhouses built with prefabricated and modular components for its design.

This simple structure of a glazed box supported by steel columns and trusses was refined with a series of custom additions that would facilitate the easy navigation and use of the market space. After deciding to adopt an architectural structure resembling industrialised vegetable sheds, the next important step was to create order in the disorderly space by adding some extensions. Based on thorough analysis, we added enclosed shops and open shelves to the space and built and entrance canopy.

A series of square shop units line three of the four edges of the market hall, measuring four metres in width to align with the metal structure’s rods. The two-metre long shelf units, which provide flat space for market sellers fill the centre of the hall, arranged in long strips to create loosely enclosed spaces for the market sellers. Given that these units were too low to support any signage, the studio designed a series of inverted pyramid structures, or “umbrellas” that sit on the structure’s thin steel columns and direct shoppers around the marketplace. Adjustable fabric coverings on the ceiling help prevent the hall from overheating and on the front facade a protruding canopy has been added, marking the market’s entrance and providing a small area of shade.

All the extensions were built with cheap and easily accessible materials including ordinary timber, lightweight steel panels, cement slabs, steel angles and polycarbonate sheets, which were easy for installation and construction,” explained the studio. Behind the main hall itself, a stand-alone single row of shops houses fish markets, alongside a small toilet block for shoppers. Once the market moves back to its original site, the studio plans to dismantle the shed and use its components in future projects.

Schierker Feuerstein Arena, Germany

At the foot of the Harz Mountains, in the Schierke district belonging to Wernigerode, a historic and listed ice stadium has been renovated. In 2013, GRAFT won the European architecture tendering for the reactivation of the former natural ice stadium and convinced the jury with their unique roof construction.

The draft by GRAFT is characterized by a roof structure that is anchored in just two points; it protects the space from rain, snow, and sunlight, but simultaneously reveals the view to the surrounding mountains and the sky above. The roof positions itself with natural lightness and elegance and merges into the landscape. The structure was developed in cooperation with Schlaich Bergermann Partner and consists of a ring in steel construction with a steel rope net covered by PTFE membrane. The roof covers an area of 2,700 square meters.

The historic stadium area transforms into a multifunctional arena presenting a highly touristic attraction. Due to the conversion measures, the arena now functions as a protected artificial ice rink in winter and a space for cultural events like concerts and theatre plays as well as sport and health events during summertime. Two new buildings on the eastern and western side of the stadium host the gastronomic range and further functional spaces. The buildings each encompass the foundation blocks of the roof so that they are visually integrated into the structure. They strongly blend into the topography and are therefore perceived as part of the landscape.

Diablos Rojos Baseball Stadium, Mexico

Chicago-based FGP Atelier has completed the new Diablos Rojos Baseball Stadium in Mexico City. Designed by Mexican-born Francisco Gonzalez Pulido, the monumental project was made to be the country’s premier baseball stadium. Working with team owner Alfredo Harp Helú, the project’s roof takes the form of a devil’s tail to reference the home team’s devilish name. Upon entering the stadium, visitors are confronted with six truncated pyramid-like forms clad in indigenous volcanic rock which form the base to much of the structure while also providing outdoor terraces at the higher level away from the arena that include food stalls and an area for socializing.

Overhead, the iconic roof stands out in one of Mexico City’s largest stadiums to date. The lightweight structure is composed of steel wrapped in PTFE textile material that plays off the light. The largest crane in the world was employed to bring the massive truss structures into position while digital scanning techniques secured precise alignment. The actual stadium itself exhibits the feel of an open-air amphitheater because of the ‘floating’ trident spear roof and features 11,500 covered seats and 8,500 additional seats in the outfield. The project was made to encourage social interaction within and outside of the stadium, with the pyramid-like structures designed to integrate a public plaza circling the stadium. Estadio Diablos was designed to bring culture and technology together, and in turn, provide new arenas for social engagement while celebrating Mexican culture.

Courtyard No. 1, China

The project is situated at the intersection of Guangzhou Road and Minjiang Road in the economic development zone of Heze City in Shandong. Due to its unique location, the project is expected to be a landmark building in the future development of the prefecture-level city. The purpose of this project is to reconsider the special function of the sales office building, in hopes of making it more sustainable through design, by becoming a symbolic public building for the future community and city.

The architectural concept is based on the artistic supremacism that reflected the social and technological changes of the 1920s, with the intention of expressing the mutual influence and interdependence between physical and virtual space in the digital age. The objects in the building are designed to float in an unstable state. Each object echoes a corresponding function in a unique form, including the entrance (horseshoe), model area (big camera lens), enterprise brand (blue stone), office area (orange-colored box), etc.

Objects floating in the air form a rich and hierarchical space, welcoming the surrounding audiences with an open dynamic posture. Some of the objects collide with the glass surface and leave traces to form a unique architectural image. As a reflection of the real world, the project attempts to look beyond a single function of the sales office through improved design, so that it can enhance the quality of public life and lead people to strive for a better future and make a positive contribution to the community.

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