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Genoa Bridge, Italy

Stefano Boeri has unveiled the design of a circular elevated walkway that will be built below Renzo Piano’s replacement for the collapsed Morandi Bridge in Genoa, Italy. Developed by his eponymous studio Stefano Boeri Architetti, working with Metrogramma and Inside Outside, the walkway forms part of the Polcevera Park and The Red Circle masterplan, which has been designed to “breathe new life” into the landscape that is recovering from the Morandi Bridge collapse in 2018.

The masterplan will overhaul the site below Piano’s replacement structure, with a circular red walkway elevated above biodiverse parkland and a “sustainable innovation” zone. The Polcevera Park and The Red Circle has been thought out as a system of parks with different ecologies and infrastructures. “For sustainable mobility and smart buildings for R&D, and manufacturing with the aim of reversing the current image of the Polcevera valley from a complex and tragically devastated place to a territory of sustainable innovation for the rejuvenation of Genoa itself.

At the heart of the Polcevera Park and The Red Circle, the giant walkway will create a circular “corridor” for bikes and pedestrians to move easily between the parks and buildings. It will measure 1,570 metres in length with a radius of 250 metres, and will be built from steel as a reference to the “powerful local tradition of blast furnaces, cranes, and overhead cranes”.

The walkway will be marked in the city by a 120-metre-high wind tower, which will be used to generate green energy that will be distributed to the buildings in the area. Below it will be the Polcevera park, which will be divided up into a number “linear fields” that will align with the bridge’s support columns. At the heart of the Polcevera Park and The Red Circle, the giant walkway will create a circular “corridor” for bikes and pedestrians to move easily between the parks and buildings. It will measure 1,570 metres in length with a radius of 250 metres and will be built from steel as a reference to the “powerful local tradition of blast furnaces, cranes, and overhead cranes”.